Saturday, May 21, 2016

George Pals’ The Time Machine (1960)




Today on Far Future Horizons we mourn the passing of veteran actor Alan Young, who starred alongside Rod Taylor in George Pal's motion picture adaptation of H.G. Wells’ classic science fiction novel “The Time Machine”.






The Time Machine (also known promotionally as H. G. Wells' The Time Machine) is a 1960 British-American time travel science fiction film in Metrocolor from MGM, produced and directed by George Pal that stars Rod Taylor, Yvette Mimieux, and Alan Young. The film was based on the 1895 novella of the same name by H. G. Wells that was hugely influential on the development of science fiction.



An inventor in Victorian England constructs a machine that enables him to travel into the distant future; once there, he discovers that mankind's descendants have divided into two species, the passive, child-like, and vegetarian Eloi and the underground-dwelling Morlocks, who feed on the Eloi.
George Pal, who had earlier made a film version of Wells' The War of the Worlds (1953), always intended to make a sequel to The Time Machine, but he died before it could be produced; the end of Time Machine:The Journey Back functions as a sequel of sorts. In 1985 elements of this film were incorporated into the documentary The Fantasy Film Worlds of George Pal.





The Time Machine received an Oscar for its time-lapse photographic effects, which show the world changing rapidly as the time traveller journeys into the future.





So without further ado we present George Pal’s The Time Machine.


George Pal's The Time Machine is available from Amazon.com



The Time Machine (1960) Part One

The Time Machine (1960) 1/2 by heapsoflovehide

The Time Machine (1960) Part Two

The Time Machine (1960) 2/2 by heapsoflovehide
Copyright Disclaimer
Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

No comments:

Post a Comment